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Contact Purple Parrot now for fantastic rates for long stay winter holidays with unlimited golf! Play every day on the West courses at Costa Esuri Ayamonte, Huelva. Located in an unrivalled position on the banks of the Guadiana River with fabulous views across to Portugal.
Prices include golf, a stylish apartment and all utility payments- contact us now!

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Great News!!
Following the success of the Summer 2015 season, the bookings are already coming in for 2016.
We urgently need more properties! To market your property with us, please contact us for more information

Great prices from Faro airport - transfers to Eastern Alarve resorts, and Ayamonte, Isla Canela, Çosta Esuri, Islantilla and Nuevo Portil in the Costa de la Luz, Spain

Why not combine your holiday with learning the local language.
From beginners, to those who just need to brush up their vocabulary, we can arrange classes to suit all levels. Whether you are here for a week or long stay.Fully qualified teachers based in Ayamonte.
Contact us for details.

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Check out the local weather to see what kind of day it's going to be today

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Read our guide to what you can see on a visit to this beautiful area

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We are here on the ground to keep you updated with the progress of your new property.
Use our complete snagging service, including a translation for the developer.
Let us arrange for the connection of your utilities.and organise the cleaning of the property after the workmen have left.
We also offer a full turnkey service for furniture, electricals, soft furnishings and landscaping - ask now for details.

PPG Newsletter Spring 2012

Semana Santa (Easter)

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In Spain, as with most predominantly Catholic countries, Semana Santa, (Easter week) is the most important week in the calendar.
Semana Santa starts on Palm Sunday and ends on Resurrection (Easter) Sunday.
The site of the huge floats bearing statues of Jesus or Mary, crowds wearing strange pointy hooded costumes and brass bands playing sombre music is something most people would associate with Spain at Easter, but how many actually know what is really going on?

A brief explanation :-

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Every city and town across Spain will have Hermandades or Cofradías (brotherhoods) dating back to the 16th century. These Cofradías have the responsibility to ensure that the catholic traditions are not forgotten. Each church within a town or city will have it’s own Cofradías and each have an allotted time during Semana Santa for their own procession, when it is their turn to carry the statues through the streets.
Members of Cofradías take their responsibilities very seriously. They are highly organised groups with governing bodies and committees. Everyone has a role to play and meet throughout the year to plan the Holy Week celebrations and events in their local area.
They have to ensure that floats, statues and costumes are properly maintained over time.
Members are coordinated to carry the cross and lanterns and bear the heavy floats. Bands must be lined up and ready to go. Everything, down to the last candle, is taken very seriously and prepared with great care and pride, in order to be picture perfect for the local press, residents and visitors.

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The Nazarenos are the members of the Cofradías who participate in the processions. They are also known as Penitentes (penitent ones).
These are the people you see who are dressed in robes and capes, wearing cone shaped head gear that makes it impossible to know who is behind their disguises. It reminds many foreigners of images of the Ku Klux Klan in the United States. However, these cone-shaped hats have no sinister significance.
According to folklore, the cone is supposed to symbolise a sort of rising towards the heavens and therefore this part of the Nazarenes’ dress is designed to bring their penitence closer to the heavens.
There has been quite a debate over whether or not women can take on the traditional role of Nazarene, but it is becoming more and more common. It is likely that women have probably been participating over the years without anyone knowing, as their identity is so disguised.
The floats are carried on the backs or shoulders of the Costaleros. It is a great honour to be chosen to be a Costalero. It is back-breaking work and many of the Costaleros are barefoot throughout the procession as part of their penance.
The one thing that cannot be planned is the weather. The processions can only take place if there is no rain, as the works of art that are carried by the Costaleros are invaluable. Should it start to rain while a procession is in progress, the works of art take refuge in the nearest church.
If rain results in the cancellation of a parade, is not uncommon to see grown men weep in frustration as their brotherhood is denied the chance to carry their thrones through the streets.
City workers must also put the finishing touches on the official routes and time schedules that processions will follow throughout their urban areas as well as co-ordinate police and other security forces that will be working throughout the holiday. And - very importantly - they must reschedule the night time cleaning crews and have extra reinforcement on hand to deal with the mess and debris that will inevitably be left behind as larger than life crowds descend upon their historic centres.
It is not unusual for municipal authorities to set up theatre style seating along some main avenues as well. These seats must be booked in advance - often far in advance and are just one more form of income for city coffers, which is probably why so much care and attention is invested in this venture.

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New Labour Law

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The new labour reform passed successfully through parliament recently and has become law after being published on Saturday 10th March in the Official State Bulletin (BOE).
The labour reform which has come under severe criticism by the trade unions will bring in some major changes to labour laws in Spain. Here are a few of the changes:
Full time workers who are made redundant will be entitled to 20 days pay per year worked.
Unfair dismissal is reduced from 45 days per year worked to 33 days and a maximum payout of 24 months pay.
A worker can be dismissed for absenteeism of 20 per cent in two months or 25 per cent over four months.
Bank Directors cannot receive pay offs which exceed more than two years of their basic salary

General Strike

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Spanish Trade Unions called a general strike on March 29th.
The two main trade unions in Spain CCOO (Comisiones Obreras) and UGT (Union General de Trabajadores) called for a general strike on March 29th in response to the new labour reform brought in under the current government Partido Popular (PP).
It is not unusual for a government to experience a general strike during their mandate and indeed every single government has had to deal with a general strike but what is unusual is that only after two months in power that the Partido Popular (PP) led by Mariano Rajoy has to deal with this 24 hour strike.
The first general strike in Spain was in 1978 and was for one hour, the strike in 1992 was for four hours or half a working day while all of the other strikes, 1985,1988,1994,2002 and 2010 have been 24 hour strikes.
There are currently 17.8 million people employed in Spain with 5.3 million unemployed giving an unemployment rate of 22.85 per cent. Less than 20 per cent of the workforce are members of trade unions with both CCOO & UGT having over 1.2 million members each.
The strike was largely peaceful, though there were some street fires and disturbances in Madrid and Barcelona. The General Workers union claimed 77% of it’s members supported the strike, though in the construction sector it was as high as 97%.
Spain is now the next big worry in terms of the Euro zone and a whole raft of austerity measures are being ratified with the aim of saving some 28 billion Euros.

Water Park?

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There have been rumours about a water park on Costa Esuri for some time now, with many people being a little sceptical about whether it will ever happen.
Well here is some news that might add a bit of weight to the rumours:-
On February 9th 2012 the road which leads from Ayamonte to the Costa Esuri was handed back under control of the local town hall.
The road (N-447) which was under the Huelva council control has been handed back to Ayamonte town hall which means that the water pipes needed for the construction of the water park can now be brought from the Ayamonte Industrial estate along the side of the road to the proposed site of the water part on the other side of the motorway.

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